Living Arts Centre

Living Arts Centre

4141 Living Arts Drive, Mississauga

The Living Arts Centre opened its doors on October 7, 1997, adding an exciting cultural dimension to Mississauga`s City Centre. Since then, more than 5 million people have come to Living Arts Centre, exploring all the Centre has to offer.

Serving as an important resource for the arts, education and business, Living Arts Centre features over 225,000 square feet of multiple performance venues, studio spaces and exhibition display areas. The two main performing arts venues - Hammerson Hall and The RBC Theatre - are the site for a range of arts, cultural and entertainment events presented by both the Living Arts Centre and community partners. The Centre's seven craft/arts studios are the home of professional Resident Artists and also feature dozens of recreational classes for all ages. Laidlaw Hall features constantly changing art exhibitions. The meeting and conference rooms are utilized by community organizations and businesses for a variety of events, from church services, to luncheon meetings, to international videoconference business meetings. The Living Arts Centre was built with generous contributions from hundreds of corporations, community organizations, individuals, as well as support from the City of Mississauga and the federal government.

The Living Arts Centre proudly serves as the performance outlet for dozens of Mississauga arts organizations and community cultural groups, including the Mississauga Choral Society, Mississauga Symphony Orchestra, Mississauga International Children`s Festival and 30 Community Organizations.

From performances of local, national and international artists and entertainers, to business and conference events, to intriguing art exhibits and community classes in a variety of arts and crafts, the Living Arts Centre is a destination for people from all walks of life.

Contact Us
For more information:
905-306-6100

Here's what's hot

To commemorate the centennial of the outbreak of the First World War in 2014, Heritage Mississauga documented soldiers from historic Mississauga who served and fell during the war.

During the First World War, Canadian soldier Lieutenant-Colonel George Stephen Cantlie plucked flowers from the fields of war-torn Europe, sending them home to his baby daughter Celia in Montreal.

Build your creative network and earn volunteer hours! The New Youth Council welcomes all Mississauga youth between the ages of 15 and 21 for weekly collaborate on creative projects with the Museums of Mississauga.

Halloween is a holiday based on ancient harvest customs but did you know its most familiar traditions like trick- or-treating were created in the last hundred years? Put on your costume and join us at Bradley Museum for a safe, outdoor experience.