Black and Indigenous Futures

Black and Indigenous Futures

Presented in partnership with the Toronto Biennial of Art

This discussion focuses on the intersection of Black and Indigenous futurisms in the work of visual artists, writers, and scholars led by Toronto Biennial of Art Senior Curator, Candice Hopkins and Toronto Biennial of Art Curator, Tairone Bastien, with Syrus Marcus Ware and Dr. Dolleen Tisawii'ashii Manning.

Syrus Marcus Ware (born in Montreal and based in Toronto) is a visual artist, activist, curator, and educator. He works in painting, installation, and performance to explore social justice frameworks and black activist culture. His work often aims to challenge systemic oppression and explore the spaces between and around identity. He is a facilitator/designer at The Banff Centre, and for 12 years was the coordinator of the Art Gallery of Ontario Youth Program. Syrus was the inaugural Daniel's Spectrum Artist-in-Residence (2016/17) and is also a core team member of Black Lives Matter - Toronto.

Dr. Dolleen Tisawii'ashii Manning is an Anishinaabe (Ojibwe/Irish) member of Kettle & Stony First Nation, and received her PhD from the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at Western University. She also holds graduate degrees in contemporary art (MFA, Simon Fraser, 1997) and critical theory (MA, Western, 2005). Dolleen works at the intersection of Anishinaabe ontology and epistemology, critical theory, phenomenology, and art. Her dissertation Mnidoo-Worlding: Merleau-Ponty and Anishinaabe Philosophical Translations, turns to Ojibwe concepts such as mnidoo (spirit or other-than-human) to propose an interrelational theory of consciousness that involves a possession by these living potencies.

Presented in the context of Amy Malbeuf's exhibition, tensions, at the Small Arms Inspection Building, January 5 to February 9, 2019

Image credit: Sidewalk Labs

Saturday, February 9, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm

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